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5 Irony Examples for College Students

5 ironies of college education

06 Dec 5 Irony Examples for College Students

Talking about college, its first and foremost objective is to impart within students a sense of being capable – capable of living independently, capable of earning themselves a handsome sum of money from a source they are interested in and are graduating, capable of learning new things and retaining what they learn in future to use it to its best. Or more precisely to say, this is what colleges must be doing. But most of the times the so-called criteria of colleges end up making fancy objectives for education which turn out to be useless in some matters for students. Here are 5 ironies of the college education.

It’s all about memorising…

Sleep vs. study. What do you do? Does sleeping sound good? Of course! But while students are sleeping and enjoying that long, well-deserved rest… they’re losing precious study time. At that time they can be reading, reading and reading some more. Studying is important, but only if students do it correctly. We know that everyone studies differently because not everyone remembers things the same way. So the key for students is to find out what type of studying technique works for them.

So let’s say putting aside time to study isn’t the problem. Let’s say everyone has the time to actually study, but what if memorizing was an issue? How are we supposed to remember everything from the last 12 weeks?! Most of us can’t remember what we had for dinner last night, let alone all the materials from the past few months of class. And it’s not like we only have one class to study for; there are multiple classes and finals! So that means we’re studying multiple subjects on the same day. We can try to space it out, but it’s still going to be math, history, science, etc. It is no wonder sometimes when we finally sit down to take our finals, we don’t really remember much.

Just do it anyways…

Essays are not fun in college. No matter what the topic or subject is. Teachers are also usually lying when they tell students that it’s “creative writing” and there are no “wrong answers.” A lot of college kids like the pressure of starting and finishing an essay in just a day or two. But most college kids hate doing them so much that they wait until the last minute to start. Yeah, most likely the second scenario. Either way, challenge accepted! We’re prepared to be up all night so we can, at a very minimum, score a solid B. So we spend our nights, typing, typing and typing, only to realize we are not even close to being done. But look, the class is creeping up – just like the sun is. “So if I get a C on the final, will I still have an A in the class?”When our motivation is nowhere to be found, calculating possible grade outcomes is second nature. Instead of spending hours studying, we substitute every possible point value to see just how low we can perform on the final assignments.

The unhealthy lifestyle…

Where colleges should be giving time management classes so that students could be taught how to cope up with studies and at the same time spare some time for themselves so that they don’t fall into unhealthy habits. However, all they do is give loads of chapters to cram and leave the rest up to students. But what is the use of such education when your health is degrading considerably? What is the point in learning in such scenario when education is meant for awareness above all? Every college student knows it all too well. Two nights before a 150-point exam that determines our grade, unhealthy amounts of caffeine, maximum of two hours of sleep each night, and a whole lot of stress.

Self-plagiarism…

The idea of self-plagiarism seems almost ridiculous, but it is a very real issue that has consequences. Self-plagiarism is the use of one’s own previous work in another context without citing that it was used previously. The idea is that the writer should let the reader know that this was not the first use of the material. I also don’t get the concept of self-plagiarism, like, “Oh, how dare I use my own thoughts without giving myself credit?” Well, it was alright till plagiarism which means that students should not copy anything and use their own ideas but why not use your own ideas again if it fits?! Plus, there are some things which just simple and true as they are. For example, “she was born in 1990”, this could be written as “her birth year was 1990”, however that doesn’t make any difference and so why not write it as it is because such things are all about remembering. How is anyone supposed to use their imagination here?!

Remembering nothing…

Speaking of not remembering what you studied…If anyone should know the difference and when to use what, it would be an English professor or perhaps, a recent college graduate, who has spent the last half-decade of her life writing papers for grades. Apparently, the latter of those is lacking in proper grammar. Using what you learned in college is a whole different thing when you can barely remember anything out of it. The main reason, as discussed earlier, is that all college education is about is making students just memorise and just do the things making studies more kind of calculation of the amount of study needed to amount of attendance to the amount of sleep to its minimum. While the maximum of all these things should be the target. Maybe if the college education was more about practical things instead of deadlines and cramming and such sort of stuff, students would enjoy their studies and college routine would not seem to be a war. Needless to say, they would remember what they have learned which is most important of all! Seems it’s a long way before such curriculum is imposed…

After a few months removed from college, it’s only common for alumni to look back on their academic journeys and consider each stage. First, there’s the happy-go-lucky freshman, who is excited to start the epic college years. Sophomore year is perhaps even better since that student is still happy, if not happier. Now, he has made friends and has less anxiety about classes. Then, junior year rolls around. He realizes that the best buckle down on his studies in order to graduate on time (or at all). After working hard for a year, he has finally made it to the final stretch. He’s in the last few miles of the marathon and ready to celebrate the victory. Sadly, this victory is short-lived, thanks to zero job prospects and feeling as if it were all for nothing.

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